Discover Leysdown, Warden & Shellness

Today, Leysdown and Warden are known as traditional seaside resorts with long sandy beaches (Quality Coast Award winner), amusements, nightclubs and camping sites. Providing excellent views over the Thames Estuary toward Essex, the area is within easy driving distance of London.

The beaches offer a combination of sand and shell with shallow waters making them ideal for paddling, however, the beach at Warden Point is a paleontologists dream, boasting a magnificent range of fossils from the prehistoric Eocene era.

Unfortunately, cliff erosion caused most of the old village of Warden to fall into the sea, losing such buildings as the church, graveyard, pub, post office and several houses. Some of these remains can be found on the beach.

Shell Beach is ideal for family fun, with play areas and plenty of room for children to run around and explore nature. The beach is usually quiet, with plenty of room for you to settle down for the day.You will find piles of shells all over the beach, hence the name; great for collecting or beachcombing. The area offers play and picnic areas, a par-3 golf course, Swale National Nature Reserve, parking at the Retreat tea house.

Take a stroll to Muswell Manor, the cradle of aviation in Britain where the first aeroplane factory was built. You can visit the manor for a meal or drink and view lots of early aviation memorabilia. Also a new sculpture near the manor commemorates those early pioneers. Then why not continue along the newly opened cycle route from Leysdown to the Isle of Harty Church and eventually reach the Ferry House Inn – escapism to stretch your legs and minds and, of course, quench your thirst, and don’t forget the camera and binoculars! Shellness is a Special Site of Scientific Interest (SSSI), a fragile and unique site, however the area is restricted.

Did You Know?

Where did Leysdown get its name? It is mentioned in the Domesday Book as being called Legesdun, possibly a combination of the Saxon words Leswe (pasture) and Dun (hill). Leysdown was given a boost by the Sheppey Light Railway, which closed in the early 1950s, but plans to develop it into a full-blown resort with hotels never got off the ground